Family playground – Greenwood Acres Campground http://greenwoodacrescampground.net/ Fri, 13 May 2022 04:21:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T160707.015.png Family playground – Greenwood Acres Campground http://greenwoodacrescampground.net/ 32 32 One person shot and injured after fight at Groveland daycare center, owner says https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/one-person-shot-and-injured-after-fight-at-groveland-daycare-center-owner-says/ Fri, 13 May 2022 03:04:22 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/one-person-shot-and-injured-after-fight-at-groveland-daycare-center-owner-says/ GROVELAND, Florida. – A shooting at a Groveland daycare center on Thursday afternoon left one person in the hospital, according to the daycare owner. The owner of We Are The Future Academy – Lisbel Rodriguez – said two brothers-in-law came to pick up their children and fought outside the office. We Are The Future Academy […]]]>

GROVELAND, Florida. – A shooting at a Groveland daycare center on Thursday afternoon left one person in the hospital, according to the daycare owner.

The owner of We Are The Future Academy – Lisbel Rodriguez – said two brothers-in-law came to pick up their children and fought outside the office.

We Are The Future Academy Card (Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.)

One of them had already picked up her child and was leaving the centre, she said.

Rodriguez said they then walked past the other family member outside the daycare, at which point a fight ensued.

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Children were playing in the playground when employees heard a gunshot, at which point workers began bringing the children inside, according to the Rodriguezes.

Afterwards, the landlady said she had locked the entire daycare center to prevent anyone from getting hurt.

She said she went back outside through a separate building and saw a man lying in some bushes near the office with a gunshot wound.

A bush near a Groveland daycare center where a man fell after being shot, according to the daycare owner (Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.)

Rodriguez said she called 911, but the shooter didn’t run away or leave — he just went to his car and waited for police, who eventually came to arrest him.

The victim was taken to Orlando Regional Medical Center for treatment. La Rodriguez said she messaged the parents of the children at the daycare to let them know what happened.

SMS between We Are The Future Academy and Baylee McDaniel (Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.)

Baylee McDaniel, the mother of a child attending the daycare, has spoken of her reaction after finding out about the incident.

“When I heard… it was a shooting, my whole heart sank,” she said. “My stomach knotted. I was like, ‘I have to go get my daughter now.’

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McDaniel said her daughter was “a little shaken up” and “crying” when she picked up the child from daycare.

“I don’t understand how anyone can be so reckless and want to do this in a children’s facility with kids on the playground, playing,” McDaniel said.

According to Rodriguez, she had heard of a family drama involving the brothers-in-law before filming.

Despite recent events, the daycare said it will still be open tomorrow.

Copyright 2022 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All Rights Reserved.

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Families are invited to A Dream Come True Playground for a day of Safe Kids fun https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/families-are-invited-to-a-dream-come-true-playground-for-a-day-of-safe-kids-fun/ Tue, 10 May 2022 20:50:32 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/families-are-invited-to-a-dream-come-true-playground-for-a-day-of-safe-kids-fun/ Published on Tuesday May. 10, 2022, 16:36 Join AFP’s more than 100,000 followers on Facebook Buy an AFP subscription Subscribe to AFP podcasts on Apple podcast, Spotify and pandora News, press releases, letters to the editor: augustafreepress2@gmail.com Advertising inquiries: freepress@ntelos.net Families from across Harrisonburg will gather at A Dream Come True Playground this week to […]]]>

HarrisonburgFamilies from across Harrisonburg will gather at A Dream Come True Playground this week to participate in various games and activities, explore first responders and other vehicles, and have their car seats checked by certified technicians – all in part of an important week of appreciation for the protection of the youngest in our community.

The event, scheduled for Wednesday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., is part of Safe Kids week, which runs from May 8 to 14. Safe Kids Central Shenandoah Valley will be working throughout the week to provide tips, resources and activities to educate parents and caregivers on simple ways to protect their children from a range of preventable injuries – including bicycling, fire, car, electrical safety and more.

At a time when parents are focused on many priorities at once, Safe Kids Week is a national celebration dedicated to celebrating children, raising awareness about child injury prevention and inspiring parents to take the time to focus on proven, practical tips for keeping their children safe. Preventable injuries are the number one killer of children in the United States, and millions more are injured in ways that can affect them throughout their lives.

“Safe Kids Week is a wonderful opportunity for Harrisonburg to celebrate children, learn how to keep them safe, and ultimately save lives,” said HFD public education officer Lt. Erin Stehle. “This is a week where we can all take some time out of our busy schedules to focus on a few simple steps that can make a big difference in keeping our children safe.”

To support parents and caregivers, Safe Kids Central Shenandoah Valley offers helpful resources, including:

  • Parent’s Guide to Child Safety – a comprehensive 24-page guide with expert advice and easy-to-follow advice to help families reduce risk, prevent injury and keep children safe at home , in the game and on the road. It is available in English and Spanish.
  • Family Safety Activity Book – a fun booklet that includes a maze, word search, coloring pages, puzzles and other exciting games for you and your kids ages 4-8 to entertain and be safe. It is available in English and Spanish.
  • Home Safety Graphic – an interactive graphic that takes parents room by room to show helpful tips on how to keep their children safe no matter where they live.

A Dream Come True playground is located at 1050 Neff Ave.

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A new center to bring together a range of bereavement services under one roof https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/a-new-center-to-bring-together-a-range-of-bereavement-services-under-one-roof/ Mon, 09 May 2022 02:42:00 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/a-new-center-to-bring-together-a-range-of-bereavement-services-under-one-roof/ Amid the pandemic, record homicides in the state’s largest city and increase in overdosesthose coping with the death of a loved one in New Mexico will soon have access to a new holistic grief support space as the 20-year-old Bereavement center for children changes its name, builds a new space and welcomes partner organizations to […]]]>

Amid the pandemic, record homicides in the state’s largest city and increase in overdosesthose coping with the death of a loved one in New Mexico will soon have access to a new holistic grief support space as the 20-year-old Bereavement center for children changes its name, builds a new space and welcomes partner organizations to move in.

Grief Center volunteer and alumna Diana Lamb sits on the organization’s building committee

Diana Lamb had lost her husband, Tony, just a year before she and her two young sons moved across the country to Albuquerque in 2009. One of the boys’ new school counselors referred the family to the Children’s Grief Center.

“I know they took so much out of the band,” she said. “But, to my surprise, I did too.”

Lamb said his children were able to play and talk about their father with other grieving children, which was normalizing. And she was able to build a community in a new town with people who understood the loss she was experiencing.

“When you go through that, you just don’t think you’re going to experience those highs in your life again,” she said. “And so to be able to do that – and smile again and laugh or cry with friends – is huge.”

Beyond support groups, Lamb said the center provided a weekly meal for her family, which was one less thing to worry about. They championed the cause of her son with special needs through her residential treatment program, and other participants even helped her deal with a need for health insurance that was causing additional stress.

“It was just always a place where you knew you could reach out and they would help you any way they could,” she said.

Lamb is now volunteering for a committee advising on the center’s renovation of over 12,000 square feet of space at 4125 Carlisle Blvd NE.

“[We’re] trying to turn this building into a warm, cozy, but also fun and inviting place for children and adults,” she said.

Jade Richardson Bock Bereavement Center

Grief Center Executive Director Jade Richardson Bock at the Center for Hope and Healing’s new reception

The Children’s Grief Center is now just the Grief Center after merging with the adult-serving Grief Resource Center in 2019. Executive Director Jade Richardson Bock said the now partially completed space is part of a five-year plan .

“So all of these offices are for rent to providers of different wellness practices,” she said, pointing to several rooms in a hallway during a recent tour.

“It can be mental health or physical health, but willing to serve a bereaved population in what we call a ‘grief-informed’ way,” she said, “which means you don’t don’t pathologize the grief or say something like ‘it’s been six months you should be better now.

what they call the Center for Hope and Healing will not only house their organization, but will also provide a continuum of bereavement services on one site.

“To my knowledge, this is the first center of its kind in the country,” said Richardson Bock.

She plans to rent space to providers associated with bereavement — like mental health therapists — but also some who might be more surprising, like nutritionists, acupuncturists and massage therapists.

“Grieving is a full bodily experience,” she said. “So it helps to have all these different ways of approaching this. And we’re going to be able to offer all of these things – as a community effort, it’s not just us.

Construction of a bereavement center

Jade Richardson Bock, director of the Grievance Center, walks through the area where a mock intensive care room is being built at the Center for Hope and Healing.

The space will also include large and small meeting rooms, an outdoor play area, a library, a wall for photos of those who have passed, and even a fake hospital room. Richardson Bock described the space as “completely the same as an intensive care room, except it’s for playing”.

“It’s to tell stories and have experiences about what it was like to say goodbye to your loved one in the hospital,” she said. “Or what you would have liked to say.”

Richardson Bock said the Grievance Center, which does not charge for its services, has raised more than $2 million for the renovation, mostly from individuals. The project is also supported by a $150,000 grant from Bernalillo County. Richardson Bock said the center is working to raise the final $232,000 needed for the renovation and recruit new volunteers to meet a soon higher capacity.

They are also always looking to find tenants, like the Resource Center for Victims of Violent Death, who was the first to sign. The organization primarily serves the families of homicide victims, helping them make informed decisions and defending them when interacting with law enforcement and the courts.

Pat Carristo

Pat Caristo (left), director of the Violent Death Resource Center at their current location with administrative contractor, Janet Delph. The organization is adding space to the Center for Hope and Healing.

Director Pat Caristo said the nonprofit’s clients have unique bereavement support needs.

“Their loved one was not lost, their loved one was taken away,” she said. “It adds a level of anger, a level of confusion, a measure of fear. The mourning period, when you have to enter this criminal justice system, is prolonged.

She said she hopes adding a second location to the Center for Hope and Healing will increase her organization’s visibility and accessibility.

“For families where the kids are hurting, they can’t come here for one group, go here for their kids, go here for another group,” she said. “So it’s a way to make it easier for them to access their services in one place.

Bereavement Center volunteer and former participant Diana Lamb said there was a need for holistic bereavement support that will emerge on the site as more services join.

“It’s a niche that we don’t fill enough at a very tumultuous time in people’s lives,” she said.

The Grievance Center plans to begin running its own programming in the space on September 1, but is ready for tenants to move into the now-completed portion of the building this month.

]]> 5 things you need to know today in Worcester https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/5-things-you-need-to-know-today-in-worcester/ Fri, 06 May 2022 12:17:52 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/5-things-you-need-to-know-today-in-worcester/ In today’s daily 5 Things You Need To Know feature, ThisWeekinWorcester.com explores five important things and stories Worcester and Central Massachusetts residents should watch closely. These five things can cover a whole range of topics and issues that we believe are relevant to understanding what is happening in the city and the towns and villages […]]]>

In today’s daily 5 Things You Need To Know feature, ThisWeekinWorcester.com explores five important things and stories Worcester and Central Massachusetts residents should watch closely.

These five things can cover a whole range of topics and issues that we believe are relevant to understanding what is happening in the city and the towns and villages surrounding Worcester.

In today’s edition – Friday May 6 – Paxton Center School hosts its first annual 5k run in support of Tyler’s teammates, Worcester Bravehearts celebrates the town’s 300th anniversary with three home games, Mothers Out Front Worcester is bringing back its “Be a Gas Leak Detective” walks, the next Worcester Downtown Business Improvement District meeting on Friday May 13, and tips for dealing with allergy season in Worcester.

Paxton Center School’s First Annual 5k Run

The Paxton Center School is hosting its first annual 5k run in support of Tyler’s teammates on Sunday, May 22.

Tyler’s Teammates was founded in memory of Tyler Trudell, a 13-year-old Paxton resident who died suddenly in May 2021.

Find more information or register here.

Worcester Bravehearts celebrate Worcester’s 300th with three at home

The Worcester Bravehearts are celebrating Worcester’s 300th anniversary with three home games over the Tercentenary weekend.

  • Friday, June 10: Friday evening fireworks
  • Saturday, June 11: Back to the tornadoes
  • Sunday June 12: Tercentenary Family Outing

Be a gas leak detective

Mothers Out Front Worcester is bringing back its “Be a Gas Leak Detective” rides on Sunday, May 15 to the Betty Price Playground at 74 Eastern Avenue in Worcester.

These walks are coordinated with a research team supervised by Dr. Sara Wylie at Northeastern University’s Social Sciences Environmental Health Research Institute and coordinated by Sarah Lerman-Sinkoff, PhD student at the Graduate School of Geography (GSG) from Clark University.

Learn more here.

Worcester Downtown Business Improvement District Meeting

The next Worcester Downtown Business Improvement District meeting will be Friday, May 13 at 9 a.m. The meeting is being held virtually.

Learn more and register for the meeting here.

Tips for allergy season

Tree pollen remains a burden for many local residents. Physicians and service providers American Family Care (AFC) in Worcester offers its expertise to relieve the allergicas well as information on the differences between allergy and symptoms of COVID-19.

American Family Care has an office in 117 Stafford Street in Worcester and offers walk-in options to meet your immediate healthcare needs, including emergency care, lab tests and vaccinations.

When it comes to controlling allergy symptoms, AFC Regional Medical Director Dr. Vincent Meoli recommends being proactive with treatment. “There are a variety of over-the-counter and prescription medications that can help provide relief for allergy sufferers,” he said. “Work with a healthcare provider to find what’s best for you.”

Dr. Meoli notes that there are also other steps people can take to minimize symptoms, such as keeping doors and windows closed, vacuuming frequently, changing clothes after spending time outdoors. and showering at night to remove pollen before going to bed.

“Check your local pollen count and if possible avoid being outside when the count is highest,” he said. “We’ve all gotten pretty used to wearing masks, so consider buying pollen masks if you have to be outside. COVID masks also provide a level of protection, except for your eyes, as the pollen particles are more bigger than the COVID virus. Just be sure to use disposable masks and dispose of them after each use, or wash cloth masks daily to remove the pollen they pick up.

Dr Meoli added: “Taking steps to keep your home clean also goes a long way to minimizing symptoms. Change your air conditioner filters and consider an air purifier, especially for your bedroom, if allergies are an issue.

Unfortunately, some of the symptoms of seasonal allergies — headaches, fatigue, runny nose and sore throat — are similar to symptoms of COVID-19, leaving people confused about when to seek testing and care.

“There are similarities between seasonal allergies and COVID-19, but there are also key differences,” Dr. Meoli said. “Itchy, watery eyes and sneezing are strong indications of seasonal allergies and are not usually associated with COVID. In contrast, a fever or sudden loss of taste or smell is more indicative of COVID. If in doubt, it is always best to consult a doctor and get tested.

Staff at AFC Worcester provide convenient walk-in care seven days a week for patients of all ages, including emergency care, physical exams, stitches for cuts and lacerations, on-site x-rays, rapid diagnostic tests and antigen tests for COVID -19 with results available within 15 minutes.

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Early transgender identity tends to endure, study finds https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/early-transgender-identity-tends-to-endure-study-finds/ Wed, 04 May 2022 04:13:11 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/early-transgender-identity-tends-to-endure-study-finds/ Children who begin to identify as transgender at a young age tend to retain that identity for at least several years, according to a study released Wednesday. The research involved 317 young people between the ages of 3 and 12 when they were recruited for the study. Five years later, at the end of the […]]]>

Children who begin to identify as transgender at a young age tend to retain that identity for at least several years, according to a study released Wednesday.

The research involved 317 young people between the ages of 3 and 12 when they were recruited for the study. Five years later, at the end of the study, 94% were living as transgender and nearly two-thirds were using either puberty-blocking drugs or sex hormones to transition medically.

Most of the children in the study came from high-income white families who were supportive of their transitions. On average, children began to identify as transgender around age 6.


It is unclear whether similar results would be found among young people from less advantaged backgrounds or among those who begin to identify as transgender in adolescence. The study was published online in Pediatrics.

Politicians seeking to ban or criminalize medical treatment for transgender youth have cited evidence to suggest that many children change their minds or “retransition”.

Some doctors say this is why transgender drugs or surgery should not be offered until affected children reach adulthood, but rigorous research into the numbers is lacking. The pediatric study is one of the largest to look at the issue, although not all children started treatment and none underwent transgender surgery.

The study is “incredibly timely … and absolutely necessary,” said Coleen Williams, a psychologist who works with the multi-specialty gender service at Boston Children’s Hospital, a clinic that treats transgender children.

“If you’re in the trenches doing this work day in and day out with trans kids and their families, that’s what we see,” said Williams, who was not involved in the study. “The majority of transgender youth and children who transition socially continue to live in their affirmed gender. »

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Mayor Barlow announces start of construction on new Breitbeck Park Playground – Oswego County Today https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/mayor-barlow-announces-start-of-construction-on-new-breitbeck-park-playground-oswego-county-today/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 16:30:53 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/mayor-barlow-announces-start-of-construction-on-new-breitbeck-park-playground-oswego-county-today/ Rendering of the new playground being built at Breitbeck Park provided by Mayor Barlow’s office. OSWEGO – Mayor Billy Barlow today announced that the City of Oswego Public Works Department has begun construction on the demolition of the current playground at Breitbeck Park to make room for the playground. incoming games of $550,000 which will […]]]>
Rendering of the new playground being built at Breitbeck Park provided by Mayor Barlow’s office.

OSWEGO – Mayor Billy Barlow today announced that the City of Oswego Public Works Department has begun construction on the demolition of the current playground at Breitbeck Park to make room for the playground. incoming games of $550,000 which will be built in June.

The new playground was custom designed to include Central New York’s first wheelchair-accessible ride and to reflect some of Oswego’s local landmarks with a nautical theme, while complementing other recent projects and investments made by the city in the park, such as a water playground, a mini-golf course, a concession stand and the installation of panoramic gazebos and fire pits.

“I am delighted to finally be able to replace the old and dangerous playground at Breitbeck Park with a playground that will add to our recent projects and provide a fun and unique experience for our youngsters,” said Barlow. “Throughout my administration, we have renovated and upgraded several city parks, playgrounds and common areas to make Oswego more accessible to everyone and a better place to visit, live and raise a family. By replacing this playground, we complete our set of projects making Breitbeck a destination point with something for everyone.

Last December, the City of Oswego secured a $413,000 grant from New York State to pay for the cost of the project, while the City Council approved additional funding of $140,000 to complete the project. The playground was designed by Ithaca-based Parkitects in consultation with city staff.

Following the removal by the DPW of the existing structure, Parkitects will arrive to assist the DPW in installing the new structure. During demolition and construction, the play area will be closed and the public is asked to avoid the construction area in the park. The new playground is expected to be built and open by July 1.

“I am delighted that we are replacing the former fragmented playground at Breitbeck Park,” said First Ward Councilor Susan McBrearty. “Several activities are outdated and do not comply with current accessibility standards. I appreciate Mayor Barlow’s commitment to improving all of our municipal parks. I would also like to thank the staff of the Community and Economic Development office; their grant-writing skills helped secure funds to offset some of the costs. I know we are all looking forward to the new playground opening in July.

The completion of the Breitbeck Park Playground will add to the list of improved areas around the community. In 2018, the city built and opened its first dog park and replaced the existing playground at Kingsford Park Elementary School.

In 2019, the city worked with Parkitects to design and build the community’s first ADA accessible playground in Hamilton Park to accommodate people with physical disabilities. Last month, the city began preparing the site for a $500,000 skate park that will be installed this fall.

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Be wild for the playground – Central Queensland Today https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/be-wild-for-the-playground-central-queensland-today/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 19:00:41 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/be-wild-for-the-playground-central-queensland-today/ MP Barry O’Rourke and Mayor Tony Williams holding an artist’s impression of the new playground for the Botanical Gardens. Photos provided. by Khrysti Balanay The Rockhampton Botanic Gardens playground is getting a facelift after exciting plans were unveiled on Wednesday. Rockhampton Area Mayor Tony Williams said familiar faces from Rockhampton Zoo inspired the new design, […]]]>

MP Barry O’Rourke and Mayor Tony Williams holding an artist’s impression of the new playground for the Botanical Gardens. Photos provided.

by Khrysti Balanay

The Rockhampton Botanic Gardens playground is getting a facelift after exciting plans were unveiled on Wednesday.

Rockhampton Area Mayor Tony Williams said familiar faces from Rockhampton Zoo inspired the new design, such as Valkyrie the wedge-tailed eagle, Henry the emu, Ernie the dingo and our chimpanzee troupe .

The playground is also expected to feature over 500 features for children of all ages and abilities.

“This new playground will be an incredible addition to one of our region’s most beloved attractions,” said Mayor Williams.

“The tender for the new playground has been awarded to Urban Play – the same company that designed the award-winning Wyatt’s Wonder Web at Kershaw Gardens and the Fitzroy Adventure Playground.

“Now that the concept has been approved, we will embark on the detailed design and construction and hope to have the new playground open before the Christmas holidays.”

The project is supported by the Queensland Government, with $1.4 million in funding provided by the Works for Queensland programme.

Local Rockhampton MP Barry O’Rourke said investing in community infrastructure helps create jobs and great community projects.

“Rockhampton Regional Council has received over $43.1 million for community infrastructure projects under the Works for Queensland and Covid Works for Queensland job creation schemes,” he said.

“Families and visitors to the area will stay and, if so, play even more, which will be another long-term boost to our economy.”

Parks Councilor Cherie Rutherford said she knows families will be thrilled to see the concepts developed for the new playground.

“The Botanical Gardens are a wonderful place to visit for the whole family,” said Cr Rutherford.

“This project will go beyond the replacement of existing end-of-life equipment.

“It’s about creating a truly special place for our community and our visitors – a place that truly reflects our region.

“I know kids will love seeing some of their favorite zoo faces reflected in this design, and the gear will include rich play options for kids of all ages and abilities.”

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Clarksburg City Parks: With Showcase Sites for Family Fun and Recreation, the Park Board Seems to Be Even Better | Harrison News https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/clarksburg-city-parks-with-showcase-sites-for-family-fun-and-recreation-the-park-board-seems-to-be-even-better-harrison-news/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/clarksburg-city-parks-with-showcase-sites-for-family-fun-and-recreation-the-park-board-seems-to-be-even-better-harrison-news/ CLARKSBURG, WV (WV News) – Veterans Memorial Park is well established in north-central West Virginia as a spring and summer fun spot for family and youth. From the award-winning 2,000-seat amphitheater to the Splash Zone aquatic facility that features a long slide, lazy river, and plenty of water to splash, the 50-plus-acre facility on Clarksburg’s […]]]>

CLARKSBURG, WV (WV News) – Veterans Memorial Park is well established in north-central West Virginia as a spring and summer fun spot for family and youth.

From the award-winning 2,000-seat amphitheater to the Splash Zone aquatic facility that features a long slide, lazy river, and plenty of water to splash, the 50-plus-acre facility on Clarksburg’s southwest side is a major asset. drawing card for visitors.






Children enjoy a waterslide at Clarksburg Splash Zone on May 31, 2021.




In addition to the Splash Zone, Amphitheater and Mayor’s Walking Path, Veterans Memorial Park also includes the River Bend Miniature Golf Course, lighted tennis and pickleball courts, six shelters for family reunions, two youth league sized baseball fields, playground equipment, boat launch, fishing pier, trail junction, nine-hole disc golf course, park dog rooms and several bathrooms located throughout the park complex.

But never one to rest on his laurels — or his facilities — Clarksburg Parks Superintendent John Cooper looks to the future, both in terms of his facilities and his own.







John Cooper

Cooper


Cooper, who has worked for the park board for 41 years and has been its chief for 35, knows this will be his last summer in charge. He announced his intention to retire on May 1, 2023.

In some ways, this can be considered bittersweet, as he devoted much of his time to making Veterans Memorial Park, Clarksburg City Park, and a network of community parks the best system in the state.

“I can’t speak highly enough of John Cooper,” said park board chairman John Angiulli. “He’s been with us for 41 years, 35 of them as a director, and he’s given so much of himself, of his family’s time.







John Angiulli

Angiulli


“He will be missed. There is very little he hasn’t seen or solved. But he deserves his time, for himself and his family. We are grateful to have him to show the ropes to the next person.

As the search for the next superintendent continues, Cooper, his staff, and the park’s board have a busy season ahead of them.

From plastering the pool in preparation for the Memorial Day weekend opening, to programming high-quality concerts at The Amp, to maintaining the many grounds of Clarksburg City Park, the season charge of the parks system isn’t in full swing, but it’s definitely kicking into high gear.

“It’s a busy time, but it’s an exciting time,” Cooper said. “We have a great staff, and they work hard to prepare us, from maintenance and repairs to new projects.”







John Cooper and Tessa Fazzini

Recreation Coordinator for City of Clarksburg Parks Tessa Fazzini and Superintendent of Parks John Cooper at River Bend Miniature Golf Course.




Both Cooper and Angiulli praised the work of recreation coordinator Tessa Fazzini, who plays a key role in helping line up high-quality acts for The Amp.

Already on the books for this season are Aaron Lewis (sold-out for June 3), the Wheeling Symphony Orchestra (free show, July 2), Chris Lane (mainly general admission tickets available July 8), and Travis Tritt. (July 30).

There will also be a Family Day event scheduled for July 23 that will culminate in a ticketed family concert, Cooper said.

“We could have another great show,” Cooper said. “And we’re working to amplify our series of free Music in the Park events.”

Every summer (unless COVID-19 interferes), the park system offers free concerts featuring local and regional artists, as well as a few tribute bands. It also offers several free movie nights with shows shown on the big screen.

Vision of something better

50 years ago when the park was relocated, commonly known as Riverbend Park, it was a collection of ball diamonds, picnic shelters and playground equipment.

Eventually, city leaders thought a large municipal swimming pool was needed – and it was. And slowly but surely, the renowned Veterans Memorial Park began to take shape.

A few baseball diamonds remain above the hill, but the majority of baseball is now played at Clarksburg City Park.

Today, Veterans Memorial Park is all about the Splash Zone, amphitheater, tennis and pickleball courts, Mayor’s Walking Path, and a quality mini-golf course. Add to that lovely picnic shelters, some designed for small gatherings and others capable of accommodating several hundred, and the park is a busy place most spring and summer days and nights. .







John Cooper

Cooper


“When the pool opens, it’s always busy,” Cooper said. “As long as the weather cooperates, we expect that again this year.”

The amphitheater is packed for large events, but also regularly stays busy with smaller events. It’s available for rent, Cooper notes.

And it is possible that the park will be even busier in the future.

A proposal by the Harrison County Commission to build an additional ice rink and pickleball courts caught the attention of the park board and Cooper.

“We’re in the study phase right now,” Cooper said. “But we have room for it, so why is the county going to look for additional land?”

The ice rink would be located near the aquatic facility while the pickleball courts would be adjacent to the location of the current courts.

“We are advertising for an engineering firm to study the possibility of an ice rink, as well as expanding our pickleball courts,” Angiulli said. “And we are grateful to the Harrison County Commission for working with us.

“Can you imagine how much more use the park would have with a winter feature, plus additional pickleball courts?” said Angiulli.

While Veterans Memorial Park is the perfect place for entertainment and family fun, Clarksburg City Park is well known for its recreational activities.

From spring and fall football to spring and summer baseball, this park is teeming with baseball players and their families.

In partnership with area sports programs, the facility now includes a small indoor practice facility to go along with five baseball diamonds, including one with college or major league dimensions. The large field – Frank Loria Memorial Field – is grassed and in high demand.

There is also an abundance of free space used by football programs, with an array of pitches that can be positioned according to the requirements of the ages involved. One of the football pitches is lit.

“Clarksburg City Park is also a busy facility,” Cooper said. “It just serves a different, more sports-focused purpose. But it’s busy every night in the spring and much of the summer.

Reaching Communities

When residents and visitors think of parks in Clarksburg, the two storefronts are the first that come to mind, but the city has a network of 16 neighborhood parks as well as Lowndes Hill Park, home to the Lookout Civil War era city and trenches. .

Playgrounds are spread throughout the smaller neighborhoods of the city including Adamston, Broadway, Carlisle, Glenwood Hill, Harrison Street, Hartland, Jackson Park, Monticello, Montpelier, Mulberry, NVAC, North Side, North View, the Quarry and Stealey Park.

This network is supported by a city-wide levy, as well as staff-guaranteed grants.

“Per capita, we probably have the most parks in the state,” Angiulli said. “We are grateful to the citizens of Clarksburg, the council and those who saw the need and worked to make this happen.”

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“We were the only game people could attend” https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/we-were-the-only-game-people-could-attend/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 09:13:12 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/we-were-the-only-game-people-could-attend/ WORCESTER — On a recent afternoon, Robert C. Antonelli Jr. stood at the entrance to a construction site not far from the Peanut of Kelley Square, but it had nothing to do with the Canal District or the polar park. Antonelli, deputy commissioner of the city’s Department of Public Works and Parks, stood just inside […]]]>

WORCESTER — On a recent afternoon, Robert C. Antonelli Jr. stood at the entrance to a construction site not far from the Peanut of Kelley Square, but it had nothing to do with the Canal District or the polar park.

Antonelli, deputy commissioner of the city’s Department of Public Works and Parks, stood just inside a temporary chain-link fence in Crompton Park, against a backdrop of gravel, cement formwork and the odd timber frame steel and wood that, when completed this summer, will be the city’s second skatepark.

Carlos Lopez lives just opposite Crompton Park and goes there every day to enjoy the relaxing atmosphere and the friendly neighbors who always greet each other.

As a skateboarding enthusiast, Lopez is excited about the upcoming skate park which will be completed this summer.

“Billiards, baseball, tennis, basketball and now a skateboard park. It’s good,” Lopez, 50, said.

The skate park is just one of many new park features going live this year in the city’s network of parks and open spaces, which has seen a marked increase in usage since the pandemic began. of COVID-19.

Department of Public Works and Parks Assistant Commissioner Robert C. Antonelli Jr. describes the construction phases of the Crompton Park skate park.

“What we discovered throughout COVID was that for a while we were the only game people could go to,” Antonelli said. “No one was traveling. We’ve seen it in our park trash pickups, we’ve seen it in general use and we’ve seen that use grow – instead of seeing the most 10 a.m. traffic at dusk we started to see it spread out at 6 at dusk.We had all these people leaving early in the morning.We were struggling to get the grass mowed.

]]> Vietnam Veterans Chapter 203 selects officers https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/vietnam-veterans-chapter-203-selects-officers/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 01:34:20 +0000 https://greenwoodacrescampground.net/vietnam-veterans-chapter-203-selects-officers/ Front row, left to right, Larry Gregory, 2nd Vice President; Charlie Hobbs, President; Bill Norton, Treasurer; JD Elesa, Board Member; Jackie Clark, Member of the Board of Directors. Second row, left to right, Denny Miller, board member; Bob Holloway, 1st Vice President; Boots Clark, board member; Bob Brauch, secretary; and Board Member Larry Anderson […]]]>


Front row, left to right, Larry Gregory, 2nd Vice President; Charlie Hobbs, President; Bill Norton, Treasurer; JD Elesa, Board Member; Jackie Clark, Member of the Board of Directors. Second row, left to right, Denny Miller, board member; Bob Holloway, 1st Vice President; Boots Clark, board member; Bob Brauch, secretary; and Board Member Larry Anderson is not represented.

Charlie Hobbs was re-elected Monday night as president of Vietnam Veterans of America, Chapter 203. The local chapter was founded more than 35 years ago and has more than 900 members, the second-largest in the United States.

The chapter will participate in the annual Armed Forces Day Parade on May 6 in Chattanooga. This is the 73rd annual parade and this year’s featured branch will be the Marine Corp. Although Armed Forces Day is the 3rd Saturday in May, Chattanooga honors the men and women who serve in the U.S. military on the first Friday of the month so area students can participate.

Members of Chapter 203 will be at Valley Fest in Dunlap on May 5, 6, and 7, displaying the Tennessee Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall.

The Vietnam Veterans Chapter 203 Appreciation Day will be held May 27-28 at the Highway 153 Walmart parking lot. Live music, refreshments and fun for the whole family. Spouses of veterans will also be honored. Everyone is invited.

The chapter meets the third Monday of each month in the MAC building at 1304 McCallie Ave. Any Vietnam or Viet Nam era veteran is eligible.

The chapter provides honor guards for veterans’ funerals. They also help vets and their families with medical supplies. For more information, call 991-5858.

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